Quotes from the NFL’s Greatest

MandyAntoniacci of Inc. magazine provides some inspirational quotes as the NFL opening weekend kicks off on Sunday.

28 of the Greatest Quotes From NFL Legends
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Running Out of Time: Clock Management

Here is Michael McKnight’s article from the August 29th, 2016 issue of Sports Illustrated regarding clock management in the NFL.

Article link: Second Nature

Even at the highest level, mistakes are made in critical junctures of the game. It is our responsibility as coaches to ensure that our players are comfortable playing in a multitude of scenarios in the critical moments of competition, no matter what your sport is.

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Quotes from an NFL Coach

Herm_Edwards_1Here are three awesome quotes by Former New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs Head Football Coach, Herman Edwards:

“A plan that can’t be changed, is a bad plan.”

“Your problems are never bigger than your purpose.”

“A goal without a plan is a wish.”

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Stop and Smell the Rose(man)s…

Philadelphia Eagles GM Howie Roseman pulled off a blockbuster trade with the Cleveland Browns yesterday to get a “franchise Quarterback”, but Roseman is not even sure who they will draft because the L.A. Rams have the overall first round draft pick.

In addition, Roseman has completely contradicted himself with comments he made in 2015 before the draft regarding trading up for Marcus Mariota:

“The history of trading up for one player, when you look at those trades, isn’t good for the team trading up and putting a lot of resources into it.”

It is just another lesson to be careful what you say (or write) and who you say it to or your words could very well come back to bite you.

Good luck Mr. Roseman. I hope your strategy works out for the Eagles, because if not your previous comments will surely condemn you.

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More Legendary than Peyton

With Super Bowl L (L is roman numeral 50) on the horizon, one of the narratives is how Peyton Manning may be able to ride off into the sunset, like his boss, John Elway did.

Manning, at age 39, broke into the league in 1998 with the Colts and the rest is NFL history.

However, there is even an more remarkable story of greatness and longevity in pro sports…it’s called Jaromir Jagr.

Jagr, who is currently 43 (44 in February) has his team in first place in their division and ranks second in points and goals on the Florida Panthers. Jagr has been on an NHL roster since 1990. He will soon compete at the NHL All-Star game once again.

Jagr may be know for his mullet, big smile and his early 90’s Penguins Stanley Cup championship teams. However, his work ethic is should not be overlooked and his late night routine has become legendary.

Just as fans flocked to catch Kobe and Peyton his season, be sure to go see Jagr in person this season before it’s too late.

Then again, he may have several great years left.

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Taking a (Calculated) Risk in Hiring

“The Unusual Hire” is a recent piece by Jon Wertheim and Sam Sommers, concerning the Cleveland Browns hiring of Paul DePodesta, of the New York Mets, as the Chief Strategy Officer (see article: The Unusual Hire – Sports Illustrated – 1-18-16 – L. Jon Wertheim )

The premise is that franchises usually don’t think outside the box when hiring coaches and upper management.

Why? Wertheim and Sommers believe that “conformity feels safer. Stick within the parameters of generally expected behavior, and the consequences of falling short are mitigated.”

Basically, if owner’s/administrators hire the safe person, they don’t risk as much professionally and personally. The “CYB” (Cover Your Butt) leadership style, allows so-called leaders to say “they looked good on paper,” “they were an alumni, I figured they could get everyone on board,” and “they came highly recommended from a good friend.” They essentially have built in excuses and can retain their job in the process.

These are all convenient (and maybe lazy) but surely safe reasons for hiring a candidate. None of these practices however, ensure future success or mean the candidate selected was actually the best fit or most qualified.

I know as a young head coach, I regularly scratched my head when recycled coaches had the benefit of earning their 3rd or 4th jobs with only marginal records and I could barely eek out an interview despite my resume. It can be a very disheartening and frustrating experience for coaches and drives many of them away from pursuing their career goals.

Maybe hires like DePodesta, if successful, will spark some renewed creativity in the interview/hiring process, where hires are based solely on merit and leadership skills.

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Giant Mistake? Be Careful What You Wish For

It is clear that the NY Giants feel that Tom Coughlin, 2x Super Bowl Champion, was the problem for the organization (see Gary Myers’ article), as everyone else in 6-10 organization was retained while Coughlin was basically forced to resign.

From all reports, it looks as though Coughlin was the scapegoat and now his offensive coordinator makes the jump from calling the plays to setting the course for the franchise.

It also get me thinking of franchises that let coaches go and then long for that coach…Do the Jacksonville Jaguars and Tom Coughlin come to mind? (See Conor Orr’s article)

Sometimes owners/GMs/ADs and the athletes think the grass is greener, but that is not always the case.

Be careful what you wish for

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