Quotes from the NFL’s Greatest

MandyAntoniacci of Inc. magazine provides some inspirational quotes as the NFL opening weekend kicks off on Sunday.

28 of the Greatest Quotes From NFL Legends
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September Soup

With the fall season just around the corner, here are some quotes about one of our favorite autumn (and year round) foods.

Proverbs

“To make a good soup, the pot must only simmer or ‘smile’ ” (France)

“A good soup attracts seats” (Ghana)

“Cheap meat never makes good soup” (Azerbaijan)

“Ye who buy cheap meat will regret when you taste its broth” (Syria)

“Too many peas spoil the soup” (United States)

“He who stirs the soup pot eats first” (United States)

“A rat’s droppings can spoil a whole cauldron of soup” (China)

“The disobedient chicken obeys in a pot of soup” (Benin)

“Better no spoon than no soup” (Germany)

“One who has been burned by soup begins to blow on the yogurt” (Saudi Arabia)

— Quotes found in “An Exaltation of Soups: The Soul-Satisfying Story of Soup, as Told in More than 100 Recipes” by Patricia Solley

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Quotes from an NFL Coach

Herm_Edwards_1Here are three awesome quotes by Former New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs Head Football Coach, Herman Edwards:

“A plan that can’t be changed, is a bad plan.”

“Your problems are never bigger than your purpose.”

“A goal without a plan is a wish.”

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Mid-Week with Yogi

Since it’s the middle of the week, I figured it would be a great time for some of Yogi Berra’s best quotes from his book “What Time Is It? You Mean Now?” to get us over the “hump”:

“If you don’t set goals, you’ll never reach them.” (p. 40)

“90% of this game is half mental.” (p. 45)

“Little things are big.” (p. 69)

“Paying attention to the basics – in baseball, it’s the fundamentals – is a little thing that’s a big thing.” (p. 70)

“You can observe a lot by watching – and you learn a lot too.” (p. 73)

“To me failure is just an opportunity to start again.” (p. 92)

“There’s a big difference between losing and failure.” (p. 117)

“I try not to get too upset over things I can’t control.” (p. 130)

“It’s deja vu all over again.” (p. 137)

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Observations from Pete Carril

Here are some thoughts by the legendary Princeton Men’s Basketball Coach, Pete Carril, from his book “The Smart Take from the Strong”:

“It is a mistake we all make as coaches to think that there is only one way of doing something. There is not. Whatever works works.” (p. 28)

“You cannot separate sports from your life, no matter how hard you try. Your personality shows up on the court: greed, indifference, whatever, it all shows up. You cannot hide it.” (p. 39)

“Every day has to be a new day with a new set of challenges.” (p. 118)

“When you demand a lot, my experience has been that you get more. If you insist on less, you get that, too.” (p. 118)

“Speed follows luck and covers a multitude of sins.” (p. 119)

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Roy Williams – Hard Work – Chapter 13 “Philosophy” – Book Notes

Here are notes from “Hard Work: A Life On and Off the Court” by Roy Williams with Tim Crothers:

Roy Williams Hard Work – Chpt 13 Philosophy Book Notes

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Death By Entitlement

 No matter if you are involved with business, education or athletics, you must surround yourself and your organization with hard workers who have a realistic view on their strengths and weaknesses and those who understand that entitlement is root of failure an organizations demise.

I was thinking about this as I watched last night’s episode of “The Profit” which involved an entrepreneur’s son who felt that he was owed a 10% equity stake in the company for no particular reason. It reminded me of a similar situation that occurred in my coaching career.

I once had a player come in to speak with my coaching staff about how they “deserved to play”. Keep in mind, that this was a freshman who had no real recourse for this statement and in the coaches eyes was uncoachable, lacked certain on the court skills and was not invested in their teammates (or the program’s) ultimate success.

What was the thought process behind this statement? 

I have an idea although it is most likely a mixture of factors and not just one lone piece. I imagine it is that this individual was spoiled/coddled by their parents (cruises, new car, etc.) and were never told “no” in any real sense. If I were to guess, they probably got “things” when the got an A on a paper or if they merely cleaned their room. 

The expectation was that they got something, instead of just doing something their best or the right way because that’s how it should be done 100% of the time. Their reward was a material item, not self pride in knowing they did the job the right way.

I don’t want to make this solely about parenting, because I still believe that each individual has a choice to make regarding if they will have an elitist/entitled attitude or not. However, this type of parenting, surely doesn’t help the child.

Moreover, in athletics especially when players are used to winning, either because they play in small high school leagues with minimal competition or AAU teams that play in low brackets and simply are more talented, constant success creates a climate where hard work and constant improvement is not really that important. The mentality of “if I work hard we will win by 25 and if I don’t we will win by 15” eventually catches up to the student-athletes in athletics, education and life.

As one can imagine, I chuckled (on the inside) when I heard “I deserved to play” thought process. I was quick to point out that “nobody deserves to play and that this program is a meritocracy and I play those players who can help our team be successful. Not one minute more or one minute less.”

Coaches must be weary of having ANY players in their program that “deserve” minutes, to start, be the leading scored, etc. One leads to two, and two leads to three, and it becomes a vicious cycle.

As the head coach, I try to instill that nobody is bigger than the program by doing ALL OF THE LITTLE THINGS to show (not say!) that not even I am above the program. Carrying uniforms, gear, sweeping the gym floor, etc. are all “menial” tasks for some head coaches, but to me it shows my players that if I can do the daily tasks and pay attention to the details, they can too.

It’s about work and success not image and attitude.

Leaders must address this behavior immediately, especially if coaches are taking over a new program and did not get to build relationships with player(s) during the recruiting process. If the player(s) cannot change their mindset coaches will be doomed to DEATH BY ENTITLEMENT or coaches will have to remove them from the program.

This is the only way to lay the foundation for building a true championship culture.

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